How to Say the Lord's Prayer

The most widely known Christian prayer dates all the way back to Jesus himself. It can be found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, though Matthew's version is the one most commonly used.

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Up next in Christian Beliefs, Prayer & Practice (7 videos)

Been a while since religion class? Refresh your memory on how to pray the rosary, go to confession, say the "Act of Contrition" and say your prayers with these Howcast videos. Plus, learn what's involved in becoming a saint.

You Will Need

  • A prayerful mind

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Close your eyes

    Close your eyes if you choose. Some people feel it's easier to concentrate this way, but it's by no means required.

  2. Step 2

    Imagine

    Imagine yourself in God's presence.

  3. Remember that prayer can happen anywhere, even in a noisy crowd.

  4. Step 3

    Begin the prayer

    Begin the prayer out loud or silently to yourself. Our Father, Who art in Heaven, Hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread And forgive us our trespasses As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not in to temptation But deliver us from evil.

  5. Some Protestants say "debts" instead of "trespasses" and "our debtors" instead of "those who trespass against us."

  6. Step 4

    Protestant ending

    If you're Protestant, continue with the ending, known as a "doxology," which was likely added in the early days of Christianity: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever and ever. Amen.

  7. Step 5

    Catholic ending

    If you're Catholic, stop after "deliver us from evil" unless you're at Mass, in which case you'll say the doxology after the priest says an intervening prayer.

  8. Step 6

    Orthodox ending

    If you're Orthodox, stop after "deliver us from evil." At the Divine Liturgy, the priest says the doxology with an addition of the Trinity. Then the Orthodox congregation says "Amen."

  9. In the Gospel version of the prayer, Jesus uses an intimate term for father in Aramaic, "abba," closer to daddy than father.

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