How to Build Bridges with Popsicle Sticks

If your last popsicle stick bridge snapped like dried spaghetti, this guide will have you building a structure worthy of New York City.

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You Will Need

  • Popsicle sticks
  • Wood glue
  • Toothpicks
  • Scissors
  • Straws
  • Flexible tubing
  • String
  • Craft store (optional)
  • Laundry clamps (optional)

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Collect materials

    Raid your family's junk drawers for enough popsicle sticks, glue, and other materials to build your bridge.

  2. Stop by a local craft store to purchase additional building materials.

  3. Step 2

    Build main span

    Build the main support spans by layering popsicle sticks halfway over each other and gluing them together until you reach the proper thickness.

  4. Use laundry clamps to secure your glued sections together until they dry for a tight bond.

  5. Step 3

    Create superstructure and road deck

    Line additional popsicle sticks perpendicular to the main span to create the road deck, then angle sticks vertically to build the superstructure.

  6. Use a cross hatch pattern along the sides and under the road deck to build a bridge that is both strong and light.

  7. Step 4

    Add details

    Use toothpicks for railings or cut the points off the toothpicks and glue several of them together in a square to make tiles for sidewalks and side panels.

  8. Step 5

    Piece together cables

    Use flexible tubing or straws and string to piece together the cables if you are building a suspension bridge.

  9. Step 6

    Test bridge

    Test your bridge with a heavy book placed on the road bed and then set it up over a creek or other body of water to transport toy cars or even a pet hamster.

  10. The most expensive suspension bridge was the $4.3 billion Akashi-Kaikyo bridge in Japan, and was completed in 1998.

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