How to Use Step Sheets to Learn Line Dancing

Learn how to use step sheets to learn line dancing in this Howcast dance video with expert Robert Royston.

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No need to sit out line dances anymore. In these videos, dancer/choreographer Robert Royston teaches you how to do basic line dancing steps and how to put them together for popular line dances like The Wobble, the Cupid Shuffle, the Cowboy Boogie, the Tush Push, the Good Time line dance, and the Sleazy Slide.

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Hi, my name is Robert Royston. I'm a five time world champion of country dance, working with artists like Taylor Swift, Carrie Underwood, Brad Paisley. I really hope that you can learn how to line dance and experience what it's like to move to America's music, and that's country music. So there's a lot of ways to learn how to do a line dance. You can take a line dance class. You can brave it out there a little bit, just jump into the jungle when you see it happening, get out there and try and learn it as you go on the dance floor. Or there's something called step sheets, or step description sheets. These you can get online. You go online, you type in whatever your favorite line dance is, or a line dance that you've maybe seen at a club you just went to and you want to learn, or something you've seen in a music video, type that it, usually you can find the step sheet pretty easily, download it, print it up, but how to read one of these things. So you take a step sheet, it'll usually have the title of the line dance on top of it, it will tell you how many counts it is, and a lot of times it will tell you how many walls it is. Is it a one wall dance, a two wall dance, a four wall dance? And it may also give you other names for the line dance at the top of the sheet, and hopefully it gives you really good suggestions for songs that you can practice to. So we have one for a line dance called Cowboy Boogie right here. So we're just gonna take a little bit of it, right. So the first thing it says is right vine. So it's telling you right vine, okay I'm gonna start by going right. Yea, so I know what a vine is, we know what a great vine is, right? So a right vine says, step right to right side. So step your right foot to right side, as opposed to it saying maybe, step your right foot to left side, which would be stepping your right to your left. So you step right to right, boom, then it says left behind. So it's telling you that your gonna start your great vine behind your left, then you're just gonna step to the right again, now you're gonna do what this says. Hop on right, bringing left knee up. Now we understand a hop is different then a jump, right. A hop means that you leave and land the same leg, which we've talked about before. So you jump up and down, that's a hop. A jump right, is actually leaving and landing a different leg. So if I jump from my left to my right, jump from my right to my left, if I hop, that's straight up and down. So we have a vine right, right, behind left, to the right, hop on right bringing left knee up. Then it says left vine. Chances are most of the time, if you read through this, whatever you did right you're gonna do left. So same thing, it says step left, to the left side, right behind, left to side, hop on left foot, bring the right knee up. And so literally what you do is read it, and a good step just description like this, tells you every little thing you need to do, step for step, what direction, usually puts it in four or eight count measures. You go through it as much as you need to. Repeat it, repeat it, repeat it, you then know the line dance, put it to music, go out to the club, and you look like a rock star. That's how you read a step description.

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  • Robert Royston

    Robert Royston began his professional career on the competitive couples dance circuit in 1989, quickly ascending through the ranks and securing the US Open Swing Dance Championship and the World Country Dance Championship, titles he held for four consecutive years (1995 to 1998). In 2007 he became the youngest person to be inducted to the UCWDC Hall of Fame. His exciting, high-energy and original work next led to his choreographing and performing in music videos. An internationally-recognized judge and instructor, Robert teaches 22 different styles of couples dancing and runs his own production company, RoRo Productions.