How to Do Sankyo in Aikido

Learn how to do sankyo from the instructors at The New York Aikikai in this Howcast aikido video.

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Okay. This technique is called sankyo. Or number three in the series of techniques that O'Sensei established. And again, this whole series, one through five, is going to start with ikkyo. So if we look at shomenuchi, ikkyo, you meet and down. Again, I want to lift the hand so that I'm looking at the palm of my partner's hand. Reach underneath. I'm going to wrap my fingers right around the inside of the palm. And the fingers are another aspect that I have. I'm going to step back. And think about pointing all of this directly at your partner as they turn and cut. Again, this is very similar to the sword work that we do in aikido. Again, I don't want to point the fingers down and cut with the butt of the sword. I want to try to cut out with the tip and the elbow of the sword. And I'm going to continue to move around the front, irimi tenkan and down. The pin incorporated here, sankyo pin. Alright. So again, you start with ikkyo. Ikkyo, lift, take the hand and step back, cut, irimi tenkan, straight down on the shoulder and pin. So if we look at the ura variation. Again, I move to the back side first, lift, continue to move behind and down, spiraling movement towards ugay's back. Up for the pin, pull through. Ura, lift, hand position, tenkan, and back. Up for the pin, pull through. Couple other variations that we'll often see, straight down, straight up. Can also use sankyo to create openings for other techniques. Sankyo, number three.

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  • New York Aikikai

    The New York Aikikai is home to chief instructor Yoshimitsu Yamada Sensei (8th Dan, Shihan, President of the United States Aikido Federation), a direct student of the founder of aikido, Morihei Ueshiba. With over 50 years of history, the New York Aikikai is the oldest continuously-operating dojo in the continental United States. World renowned and respected for its traditional aikido instruction and outstanding faculty, it offers unmatched training opportunities for beginners and advanced students alike. The New York Aikikai is an international hub for aikido, drawing students from around the world with its unique blend of quality, tradition and innovation.