How to Place Flowers in a Floral Foam Arrangement

Learn how to put flowers in a floral foam arrangement from florist Sarah Brysk Cohen in this DIY flowers tutorial from Howcast, part two of two.

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Choosing your wedding flowers can be overwhelming -- especially when you see how much they can cost! Save some money by learning how to make some of the bouquets and floral arrangements yourself. Floral designer Sarah Brysk Cohen makes it easy by walking you through the steps in these videos.

 
 

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Transcript

So as you can see I've been adding lots of flowers to this floral foam vessel. An important technique tip is that when you're adding flowers to floral foam you always want to add the flower in one spot and once you place it in that foam you never pull it out and move it. So if I for some reason had to take that flower and put it somewhere else I would take it out but I would never put another flower in that hole again. Because once the flower goes down into the floral foam it soaks up the water and it seals and you lose the water from that spot. So if I put another flower in there there would not be the water available for the new bloom. So just keep working with your vessel. Spinning it, I find really helps. Spin it around and around. And you start to look up and down the vessel making sure that all the holes are filled in. And another great thing about working with floral foam is you have a ton of control. So I can put flowers high, low, I can angle them, I can get them to sit very securely in the spots where I place them. And even though it might feel a little intimidating at first, it's actually a really great way to work with flowers if you're a beginner. Because you've seen how quickly this can fill up and start to look really beautiful. So I'm spinning and spinning and spinning, just filling up the holes. Something really key with floral foam is that you want to, as we talked about before, make sure that nobody can see, and I'll spin it here and show you, nobody can see the lip of the vessel. At the end of the process you want it all covered. And you especially want that tape that we used to secure the floral foam all covered up. So you'll keep placing flowers in the foam to make sure that that lip is covered and that that tape is covered. Every time I place something in I want to make sure you can kind of tuck it in between the other flowers. I want to make sure I can feel that going into the floral foam. And you can even peek down in and see if you'd like. But make sure it has enough of the floral foam to drink some water. Keep working with it and see how the shape is changing and growing. So a great trick for covering the lip of the vessel is to use something really fluffy like this Queen Anne's Lace or a Hydrangea because it really obscures the view and it covers so nicely with just one bloom. So there you can see that. Another element for texture when working with floral foam is to use a lovely vine like some Jasmine. It's really fragrant and it's really beautiful. And you can actually stick it into the floral foam and let it trail along the table so it gives that garden-y look, which I really love. So we can tuck some in here. It's also a nice trick for obscuring that lip. Hiding that lip. One last note about floral foam is that if you do add too, too many flowers to that piece of floral foam that you saw at the very beginning, you have to think about that floral foam is going to be feeding water to all of these flowers. So absolutely take that into consideration. And how many flowers you add, they all have to be drinking that water from the floral foam. So just make sure that you don't add too, too many so that the oasis floral foam gets dry and you'll have to continue to re-water it every day or two. And that is how you add flowers to floral foam.

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  • Sarah Brysk Cohen

    Sarah Brysk Cohen, who opened the Blossom and Branch floral design studio in Brooklyn, New York in 2009, has been working on the cutting edge of floral design, from New York to California, for 20 years. Her designs have been featured in various online and print publications, including Style Me Pretty, 100 Layer Cake, Brooklyn Bride, Brides magazine, The Knot, New York Magazine Weddings and The New York Times, as well as in the San Diego Museum of Art. In addition to providing event florals and decor, Sarah teaches floral design classes and is a regular contributor to the internationally-renowned blog Design*Sponge.