How to Potty Train Your Parrot

Learn how to potty train your parrot from Parrot Wizard Michael Sazhin in this Howcast video.

Okay. Now, when it comes to potty training your parrot, the thing you need to realize is that birds are wild animals. They’re going to poop every 15 to 30 minutes, depending on the species. So, the first thing you got to do is get out of your mind that you’re going to have a perfect potty train that’ll never poop on anything. Because no matter how good of a job you do, accidents will still happen.

So, stock up on good cleaning supplies: a wetvac, a mop, anything you can use to clean your parrots nest is good. The less of a big deal you make about the parrot making a mess, the less you’re going to encourage any of that type of behavior.

Another strategy is to keep the parrot on parrot-approved places, like this tree right here. The bottom is made to be easy to clean. So, if the parrots spent a lot of their time on parrot places instead of on human furniture, you’re less likely to have a mess throughout your house. Part of the strategy for keeping your parent on parrot-approved places is to do a lot of training, like the tricks we’ve been going over.

If you teach your parrots tricks on their training arches and trees, they’re more familiar with spending time on those places and their more likely to go over to them when they’re out and about. Now, when it comes to actually the potty training process, you can’t really do it the same way that you teach normal tricks such as clicking and giving a treat. That’s known to make parrots hold it in for too long and that can actually hurt their digestive system.

So, instead, it’s important to encourage the parrot to poop on it’s designated places but not mandate it. So, the strategy is to realize how long between poops that your bird goes. If you realize that you have a small bird and it goes every five minutes, that’s going to be the number you go for. The bigger bird might be half an hour. But these guys, maybe about 15 minutes.

So, what Im going to do, when I want to just spend time with my bird, I want to have him on my shoulder, on me, I will hold them and make sure that I’m not spending more than the allotted time between when they go to do their business. So, I might pick up the bird and hold it for ten minutes. Knowing that they’re going to poop in 15. Play with them, do whatever I want to do with my pet.

Then, I’m going to go and put them back down on their stand after ten minutes elapses. Now, I’m going to wait five minutes until they finally take their poop, whatever that comes out to. And as soon as they do, I’m going to make a big deal. Be like "Wow, that was very good! That’s great!" And I’ll come back over and pick up the bird and spend more time with it again.

And then ten minutes goes by. I feel like a next poop is due. Before it can happen, I’ll put her back down on the perch and wait until she does it. After you do this for a couple weeks or months, your parrot will catch on that the sooner they do their business when they’re put down, the sooner you’ll pick them up and keep spending time with them.

So, they learn to naturally do more of they’re business around their perches instead of on you or on unapproved human furniture areas. If your parrot wings aren’t clip and they’re flighted, they can even learn to fly back to they’re stand when they need to go, which is really convenient if you lose track of timing. If they’re familiar and accustomed to pooping on their stand, they’ll fly over when they need to go.

The last thing you can do to encourage your parrot do it’s business on it’s poopy perch is when you take it out first thing in the morning, put it down on it’s perch and wait until it’s goes. Most parrots hold it in at night and they have to go really bad in the morning and they try to avoid going in their cages.

So, as soon as you take them out, put them right down on their poopy perch and let them go. And after they’re done, you can pick them up and do your normal routine with them. This way, they learn to go to that designated place and to hold it in until you put them down and it’s time to do it. So, that’s some tips for you about potty training your parrot.