At What Age Does Schizophrenia Develop?

Learn at what age schizophrenia begins to develop from psychiatrist Jeanie Tse in this Howcast video.

Close
X
Playback

Up next in How to Understand Schizophrenia (45 videos)

Schizophrenia is a brain disorder that is often confused with other mental illnesses. In these videos, you'll learn what exactly schizophrenia is, how to recognize it, the latest ways to treat it, how to help an afflicted loved one, and much more.

 
 

Comments

Transcript

The symptoms of schizophrenia generally develop between the ages of 25 and 35. It tends to be towards the earlier 20s in men and towards the later 20s and early 30s in women. There are also people who develop it very late, in the 40s to 60s, and that tends to be more women and after menopause. There's also a very small number of children who develop schizophrenia in the order of one in 10,000 and usually those are children ten years and up. So, it can affect people of all ages, but primarily it starts in young people between the ages of 25 and 35. This is important because it really starts in people who have already established their identity as adults, attained independence, have graduated from college or just starting to college, and it really takes everything for some people. It takes away their hopes and dreams and makes life very difficult. However, recovery is possible and many people find after receiving treatment they're able to get back on track with the lives that they had hoped for themselves.

Expert

  • Dr. Jeanie Tse

    Dr. Jeanie Tse is a board-certified psychiatrist with a diploma in child and adolescent psychiatry from McGill University. She is the Associate Chief Medical Officer at the Institute for Community Living, Inc., a not-for-profit serving over 10,000 New Yorkers with mental illness and developmental disabilities; she is also on the faculty of both the NYU and Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowship Programs. Her interest lies in bridging the gap between research and clinical practice to help people and families achieve true recovery.