Do Rabbits Get Along with Other Pets?

Find out if rabbits get along with other pets in this Howcast video featuring bunny lover Amy Sedaris and rabbit expert Mary E. Cotter.

Close
X
Playback

Up next in How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit (49 videos)

Rabbits make wonderful pets. If you're thinking of getting one, check out these videos: Actress Amy Sedaris, who is a loving mom to her own pet bunny, helps rabbit expert Mary E. Cotter, Ed.D., LVT answer all your questions about how to take care of a pet rabbit. It's not always easy, but it's worth the work.

 
 

Comments

Transcript

Speaker 1:Do rabbits get along with other pets? Other animals? Speaker 2: Well, it depends on the other animals and it depends on the rabbits, but usually yes. I think a lot of people, myself included, have other pets in the house. I have a small dog who gets along really well with rabbits. There's no predatory inclination in my dog at all. She doesn't chase the rabbit. indifferent to them. Speaker 1:Is that because they don't eat the same food? You do know what I mean, or what? Speaker 2: I don't know because most dogs will eat rabbits. So, I mean, I don't know. I have fostered this year for our local shelter for dogs. The first three dogs I fostered were so interested in the rabbits. They would stand on their hind legs and go.. Speaker 1:Oh, okay. Speaker 2: So, I knew that they would never be in my home for long. They would be fosters. Then the fourth dog I fostered, I took her because she was pregnant and this freed up a shelter cage and it turned out that that dog was completely indifferent to rabbits, so I'm adopting her. Speaker 1:Oh, wow. Speaker 2: As of a week ago. Speaker 1:Oh, yeah. . . Speaker 2: She's going to stay in my home, so there's of breeds of dogs that will get along really, really well with rabbits. Some breeds you have to be very cautious about. I would say greyhounds for example that are bred to chase rabbits. Speaker 1:Oh, sure. Speaker 2: The little terriers that are ratters. They call them ratters because they're bred to go after small animals like rats. Speaker 1:But if the rabbit's not running that fast in the apartment, you know what I'm saying? Speaker 2: Yeah. Speaker 1:Isn't that most usually the cat. Isn't it usually what they're attracted to is because they see the rat? Speaker 2: They are. Cats particularly are attracted to movement and this is why you have to be careful with cats because cats body movement. If you watch a cat you know, a cat will move up very stealthily like this and keep his gaze on you. Rabbits bounce and that's what cat toys do too. If you buy cat toys you'll notice a lot of them have that bouncing motion. Speaker 1:Okay. Speaker 2: So, what's the normal movement of a rabbit is attractive to a cat almost as if the rabbit's a toy. Speaker 1:Okay. Speaker 2: So, you have to be really careful. That said, a lot of people have cats and rabbits and there's one of our volunteers in New Jersey who has a house full of cats and three or four rabbits. One of her cats has fallen in love with one of her rabbits which is in New Zealand [SP] Lake and she sent pictures of the cats cuddling with the rabbits and grooming the rabbits and they're very, very charming, but you know, caution needs to be exercised. That said, there are many, many dogs and cats who can get along very well with many, many rabbits. Just be careful with the introductions.

Expert

  • Mary E. Cotter

    Mary E. Cotter, M.A., Ed.D., LVT is the founder of the NY-based Rabbit Rescue & Rehab. She serves as chapter manager of the NYC House Rabbit Society and is vice president of the International House Rabbit Society. Involved with rabbit rescue since 1982, she speaks and writes frequently on rabbit-related topics, addressing owners, veterinary professionals and shelter workers. Mary is an adjunct assistant professor in the veterinary technology department of LaGuardia Community College (City University of New York) and co-manages a 7,000-member Internet mailing list focused on rabbit health, care and behavior.