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How to Solo using Patterns on Pentatonic Scale

Learn how to solo using patterns on the pentatonic scale in this keyboard tutorial from Howcast.

Transcript

Hi, this is Stephanie from Tomato's House of Rock and I'm going to show you how to solo using patterns from the pentatonic scale. So the pentatonic scale lends itself really nicely to playing little patterns and taking them up and down. It just really creates a great sound and it's pretty simple to get under your fingers as well.

So, obviously, with patterns they're endless. We're just going to start with one of the most basic ones, but again it can give you a lot of mileage. Let's use the C major pentatonic scale for this. What the pattern is going to be is just one, two, three, so I'm just going up three notes in a row.

Just to review in the C major pentatonic scale we've got C, D, E, G, A and C back on top again. So if I was just to play one, two, three only on those notes, nice and slowly it would be like this. One, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three and then back up top again, one, two, three.

So that's how it sounds like slowed down. When you start to speed it up it really can give a nice rolling effect. So now with a little bit more speed we might have... and you could just keep going up and down as far as you'd like with that. Then you maybe want to think about coming down.

So when you come down you have two choices. You could come down now going three, two, one if you wanted, but let's keep that as its own separate pattern that you're going to practice to get in your fingers. So we're going to keep up that pattern of one, two, three but now we're going to come back down that C major pentatonic scale.

So now we've got one, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, and now again with a little bit more speed we'd have... and then from there you can take your solo wherever you want to go. So they're also really nice because I feel like they're really easy to transition in and out of and whatever kind of line you're doing that's a great thing to just throw in there. So, let's hear what this one sounds like with some music. That's how to solo using a pattern on the pentatonic scale.

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