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What to Expect at a Modeling Audition

Learn what to expect at a modeling audition from model scout Trudi Tapscott in this Howcast video.

Transcript

Trudy:Hi. I'm Trudi Tapscott.

Britt: And I'm Britt Bergmeister.

Trudi:In order to get a modeling job, you need to go on a modeling casting and you need to go on an audition. What happens there?

Britt: I mean, generally you go and meet the clients. Sometimes there will be a few girls there. Sometimes the wait will be five minutes. Sometimes there will be over 200 girls and the wait will be two, three hours. You've got to be open and you can't get frustrated. Bring a book. You're going to be waiting a long time. Bring water, bring snacks. Don't get frustrated. It'll come across when you meet the client, so just be happy. Be thankful that you have the opportunity to get a job and just show your happy, confident personality.

Trudi:What happens? They ask you for your book or your first...?

Britt: Generally, you'll walk in. They'll ask for your book and you hand them your book, maybe a comp card, and sometimes you'll have to take a picture or two just so they can remember how you were that day. Sometimes you'll have to introduce yourself to a video camera, and sometimes you'll have to walk. That's a big thing. You'll definitely have to walk. So, it depends on the client and what you're casting for, but generally they'll let you know.

Just be prepared. Have your high-heel shoes. Have something that will show off your body. I usually wear black, something black and tight. So, yeah. That's generally what happens.

Trudi:That's generally how it goes. Sometimes you're meeting one person. Sometimes you're meeting five. You walk into a table of five people.

Britt: Yeah.

Trudi:Sometimes everyone is in the same room. Sometimes you go in a separate room. I think that if the casting people have more than one person there, sometimes they talk amongst themselves or they talk about the pictures in your book. They ask you, "Who shot this?" or, "Who's the photographer?" It's really good for you to remember the names of the photographers that you shot with if they say, "Who shot this picture?" So, that information is good because if you don't know that answer then it doesn't make you look like the smartest model.

Britt: Right.

Trudi:So, you want to be able to know the information that they might ask in your book or, "Where did you shoot it?" Or, "When did you shoot it?" They're trying to get a conversation going, but there's not many questions they can ask you when they don't know you. They just want to kind of know things about your book. Then they might say things between themselves that are related to the job that might not make any sense to you and that might not have anything to do with you. So, you can't really let that effect you.

It's not about how quickly they look through your book. They're fast. Especially in New York and Paris, and Milan, it's fast. They don't have a lot of time.

Britt: Yeah.

Trudi:So, the decision is made after. You're never going to know right then anyway, so it really doesn't matter. You just have to do the best you can, assume you're getting the job and walk out. That's pretty much what happens.

Britt: They might not show any emotion at all. You can't take that as a no. They could be happy, they could be sad that day. They could be really annoyed. But just go in confidently and, hopefully, you'll get the job.

Trudi:It's not your job to read them.

Britt: No.

Trudi:It's their job to read you.

Britt: Exactly.

Trudi:So, that's how it works.

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